Archaeological Resources Protection Act - United States (Land Recoveries)

The Archaeological Resources Protection Act, was enacted in 1979. ARPA strengthened the permitting procedures required for conducting archeological fieldwork on federal lands, originally mandated by the Antiquities Act. Bellow is a brief synopsis of the ARPA

 
[]

Mission Statement:

Treasure Expeditions Bradley, Brad, WilliamsonTo ensure the continuation of our successful expeditions, both domestic and international, based on factual historical and archival research, utilizing the best professionals in the industry. Also to provide a return on investment while maintaining the highest archaeological standards.

 

Company Motto:

Insisto Vestri Somnium

Treasure Expeditions Bradley, Brad, WilliamsonInsistion Vestri Somnium is Latin for "Follow Your Dream". We invite you join us and follow your dream to find Lost & Sunken Treasure!

Welcome to Treasure & Adventure:

Treasure Expeditions Bradley, Brad, WilliamsonWe invite you to join us either by following us on our site or actually joining us in our quests of excitement and adventure as we search for, locate and recover rare artifacts and treasures.

 

Archaeological Resources Protection Act

Overview

An important piece of archeological legislation, the Archaeological Resources Protection Act, was enacted in 1979. ARPA strengthened the permitting procedures required for conducting archeological fieldwork on federal lands, originally mandated by the Antiquities Act. It also establishes more rigorous fines and penalties for unauthorized excavation on federal land.

ARPA is important from the standpoint of managing archeological collections because it:
• acknowledges federal ownership of objects excavated from federal lands;
• calls for the preservation of objects and associated records in a "suitable" institution; and,
• prohibits public disclosure of information concerning the nature and location of archeological resources that require a permit or other permission under ARPA for their excavation or removal.

An application for an ARPA permit must include authorization and a written agreement between the federal agency and an appropriate repository that will house and curate the collection recovered from the project. This permit process applies to all excavations on federal and Indian/tribal lands. ARPA also is the third law that permitted the Secretary of the Interior to issue regulations on the care and management of archeological collections. These regulations (36 CFR Part 79) were issued in 1990.

In order to accommodate the repatriation or disposition requirements of NAGPRA, the ARPA regulations dealing with custody and ownership of archeological collections were amended in 1995 (see 43 CFR Part 7.13).

 

Treasure Expeditions: treasure hunting, archaeology and shipwreck recovery

Treasure Expeditions Banner 

 

 

 

 

Welcome
Welcome
Treasure Chest Underwater Archaeology Queen's Jewels Silver Bar and Coins Gold Coins and Chain Underwater Cannon Gold Doubloons and Divider 
Welcome
themed object
Treasure Expeditions: treasure hunting, archaeology and shipwreck recovery
Bookmark and Share